Setting Expectations as a Manager

Setting Expectations as a Manager

One simple way to create predictability and stability for your team is to be transparent about what you expect of your teammates, and what they can expect of you.

All kinds of organizational expectations (quarterly goals, job descriptions, team mission statements, etc.) will evolve based on company context, scale over time, leadership changes, you name it. As our environments change, managers need to flex HOW they set expectations, to set their teammates up for success.

In this workshop, we talk about how to balance being empowering and being directive as a leader, and how to know when to switch up your approach. We’ll also work on helping managers identify their default approach, so that they can see when it's most useful, and when they might need to adapt it based on what their team or company needs, what the challenge is, how much urgency there is.

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Lara Hogan

May 13, 2018
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Transcript

  1. Setting Expectations

  2. • Company-wide e.g. company values • Function-specific e.g. skills matrix,

    career ladder • Team-specific e.g. team mission • Individual-specific e.g. quarterly goals
  3. • Company-wide e.g. company values • Function-specific e.g. skills matrix,

    career ladder • Team-specific e.g. team mission • Individual-specific e.g. quarterly goals
  4. Why should we set expectations?

  5. • Improvement and progress • Clarity and transparency • Alignment

    and efficiency • Feedback
  6. Empowerment vs Direction

  7. Empowerment Direction

  8. Empowerment Direction Coaching teammates to connect their own dots Sponsoring

    teammates for visible/stretch assignments Group brainstorming to create expectations docs and roadmaps
  9. Empowerment Direction Coaching teammates to connect their own dots Sponsoring

    teammates for visible/stretch assignments Group brainstorming to create expectations docs and roadmaps Writing job descriptions for each team role Mandating a desk move Assigning work to each teammate
  10. Moving along the spectrum

  11. Your cross-functional peer is falling short on their core responsibilities.

  12. Your direct report wants to be promoted, but you’re not

    sure if they’re ready.
  13. Your direct report has come to you with a competing

    job offer at 2x their current salary.
  14. One of your direct reports has been mean to their

    teammate when you’re not around.
  15. When a new request comes in for your team, no

    one jumps in to triage or address it.
  16. A senior leader routinely interrupts you in meetings.

  17. Giving strong direction

  18. Practice bottom-lining it. • Start with paragraphs • Narrow to

    2 sentences • Narrow to 1 sentence
  19. Reframe this skill in terms of fairness.

  20. Roleplay different ways to give direction as practice.

  21. Risks and tradeoffs

  22. Knowing our default

  23. Management/ Leadership Philosophies

  24. “Humans already have the answer(s) inside themselves; I help find

    them.” - me
  25. “Optimize for long term relationships.” - Jason Wong, Senior Director

    of Engineering
  26. “Strong back, open heart.” - Jerry Colonna, who introduced it

    to... - Chad Dickerson, former CEO, now coach
  27. "The strength of the team is each individual member. The

    strength of each member is the team." - Phil Jackson, former head coach of Chicago Bulls - also Jill Wetzler, Head of Engineering
  28. Moving along the spectrum (switching it up!)

  29. Homework: Experiment more with the spectrum. Data-gather: what effect does

    each place on the spectrum have on you and those around you?
  30. Homework if you want to try out more group empowerment:

    Brainstorming Team and Manager Expectations Worksheet
  31. Focus on writing down expected outcomes (rather than behaviors)

  32. Get curious about (and prioritize) what your teammates’ needs are

  33. Treat team expectation docs as living documents!

  34. Open Q&A! You can always email me: lara@wherewithall.com